4 Key Takeaways from the Syrian Chemical Attack

4 Key Takeaways from the Syrian Chemical Attack

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4 Key Takeaways from the Syrian Chemical Attack4 Key Takeaways from the Syrian Chemical Attack

The Syrian chemical attack has shocked the world, and the blame game is on in full force—like children in the Principal’s office. Putin blames the Syrian rebels, and the rebels blame Assad. The only certainty is that real, flesh-and-blood people are dying. Here are four key takeaways from it all.

1. The Casualties

The Syrian city of Khan Sheikhoun has suffered what appears to be a chemical attack on civilians. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reports that 131 Syrian citizens are dead as a result, 41 of which are children.

Khan Sheikhoun sits in the Idlib province, southwest of Aleppo, and is a rebel stronghold.

2. Worldwide Reactions

The US, along with other western nations, is attributing the Syrian chemical attack to the Syrian government, claiming it dropped a chemical bomb. No accounts have been confirmed, but the US is drafting a U.N. Security Council statement demanding an investigation.

The West isn’t alone in the condemnation of these attacks. Iran has also spoken out, and even offered to assist the Syrian people. “Iran condemns any use of chemical weapons, regardless of who has used it and who are the victims,” a spokesman for the Iranian Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

3. The Counterclaim

Russian officials have a different account of the events that took place, claiming that Syrian warplanes attacked a rebel-owned chemical-weapons depot.

“The territory of this storage facility housed workshops to produce projectiles filled with toxic agents,” the spokesman for Russia’s Ministry of Defense, said in a statement.

Hasan Haj Ali is the commander of the Free Idlib Army rebel group that controls the territory, and disagrees with Russian accounts, labeling them an outright “lie.” Ali described the event to Reuters. “Everyone saw the plane while it was bombing with gas.

“Likewise, all the civilians in the area know that there are no military positions there.”

It’s hard to tell whom to believe in this situation, considering that all sides have much to gain from implicating the others. All accounts should be met with deep skepticism.

4. What Needs to Be Done

World powers will assuredly respond with emotion, rather than reason, and point to civilians crying for help to justify military actions against whomever they believe the guilty party is.

The last thing the Syrian people need is for sympathetic, western nations to intervene and make the situation even worse. Powerful nations regularly overestimate their ability to end a crisis, thinking they can waltz in and bring peace within a matter of days. This conflict is far too complex for observers to believe arrogantly that they have all the facts and know what is right for the Syrian people.

Humanitarian aid is necessary, but intervention brings more tragedy and chaos. A free Syria must be achieved by Syrians.


4 Key Takeaways from the Syrian Chemical Attack

The Syrian chemical attack has shocked the world, and the blame game is on in full force—like children in the Principal’s office. Putin blames the Syrian rebels, and the rebels blame Assad. The only certainty is that real, flesh-and-blood people are dying. Here are four key takeaways from it all.

1. The Casualties

The Syrian city of Khan Sheikhoun has suffered what appears to be a chemical attack on civilians. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reports that 131 Syrian citizens are dead as a result, 41 of which are children.

Khan Sheikhoun sits in the Idlib province, southwest of Aleppo, and is a rebel stronghold.

2. Worldwide Reactions

The US, along with other western nations, is attributing the Syrian chemical attack to the Syrian government, claiming it dropped a chemical bomb. No accounts have been confirmed, but the US is drafting a U.N. Security Council statement demanding an investigation.

The West isn’t alone in the condemnation of these attacks. Iran has also spoken out, and even offered to assist the Syrian people. “Iran condemns any use of chemical weapons, regardless of who has used it and who are the victims,” a spokesman for the Iranian Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

3. The Counterclaim

Russian officials have a different account of the events that took place, claiming that Syrian warplanes attacked a rebel-owned chemical-weapons depot.

“The territory of this storage facility housed workshops to produce projectiles filled with toxic agents,” the spokesman for Russia’s Ministry of Defense, said in a statement.

Hasan Haj Ali is the commander of the Free Idlib Army rebel group that controls the territory, and disagrees with Russian accounts, labeling them an outright “lie.” Ali described the event to Reuters. “Everyone saw the plane while it was bombing with gas.

“Likewise, all the civilians in the area know that there are no military positions there.”

It’s hard to tell whom to believe in this situation, considering that all sides have much to gain from implicating the others. All accounts should be met with deep skepticism.

4. What Needs to Be Done

World powers will assuredly respond with emotion, rather than reason, and point to civilians crying for help to justify military actions against whomever they believe the guilty party is.

The last thing the Syrian people need is for sympathetic, western nations to intervene and make the situation even worse. Powerful nations regularly overestimate their ability to end a crisis, thinking they can waltz in and bring peace within a matter of days. This conflict is far too complex for observers to believe arrogantly that they have all the facts and know what is right for the Syrian people.

Humanitarian aid is necessary, but intervention brings more tragedy and chaos. A free Syria must be achieved by Syrians.