Mountain goats have incredible cliff-climbing skills —So as BitCoin!

Click here to view original web page at www.businessinsider.com

“Mountain goats have incredible cliff-climbing skills — So as BitCoin! — Suresh M Kannan”

I read an original article about the maintain goats from the business insider and I saw an add from Bitcoin on the same page. A coincidence?? Let me share my thoughts.There are a number of close resemblance between mountain goats and Bitcoin.

“Mountain goats are amazing. They can climb super high on really steep cliffs like it’s nothing. — Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies does that well”

“They hang out on mountaintops for most of the year, shedding their shaggy winter coat when they lower their elevation for the spring and summer. — BitCoins are going to finish with their shaggy winter coats”

How do mountain goats climb so well? What are their secrets?” — Yeah it’s amazing how much they claim so well. It is fantastic watching them climb. But will you pay someone to own them? If yes, whom do you pay? And why the person is trading this precious goat for a dollar. And after buying what are you going to do? You say mountain goats are precious. Yes. I say, precious to watch from a distance. But I will pay and own a local goat which is worth something to me because I know it is an asset that can be traded.  Every question is applicable to bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies.Mountain goats have incredible cliff-climbing skills — here\'s how they do it


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They use the precipitous heights of their mountain homes for protection from predators.– Probably it is true in bitcoin or other cryptos as well. They are climbing to protect themselves. Or someone is driving them to the mountains so that they can fall off the radar from the people who are busy watching them.

“Mountain goats are only found in North America, concentrated around the Rocky Mountains. There are about 100,000 of them today. — People find BitCoins Rare and only limited”

Yes. It is true. Same as 100,000 of the mountain goats. Their numbers are limited and may not increase. But does it mean they are worth something? It is so stupid to promote the concept that way.

“Mountain goats can pull themselves up inclines with just one hoof. — Yeah. Because they are born that way; so as human speculations on anything”

I can bluff and speculate what I have in had worth hundred or thousand times. It’s my mind. I can come with whatever I want as long as I make others believe and I am allowed to do it because i am not controlled by anyone when it comes to it. Free market economists say that it’s between the buyer and seller. But when they loose where they will come for rescue? Other citizens ( and government) Are these people willing to accept their failure 100% on their own? Can they promise that they will never ask the government to trade back dollar for what they have in hand? Even $1 per coin?

Mountain goats have incredible cliff-climbing skills — here\'s how they do it“Mountain goat Kids can start climbing with their parents when they’re just days old” — so as other crypto currencies following bitcoin.

This is the kids play where they believe their collector card is worth something. It has come to mainstream economics. I did stamp trading when I was young too. Then I grew up. It looks like most current generation people did not grow up. Most of them are sitting on the couch and playing video games believe the coins they earn worth something. Yeah…within the gamers community it is believed so. These gamers and the community of programming nerds who do not know the real world economics and social structures of countries and monetary system believe that their money is better than fiat currency by the central banking system.

“Well, It is painful to see local goats are following them like herd pretending to be mountain goats” — Other cryptos are also taking the same leap and the world already started speculating their values. Dont you know that atleast a mountain goat may not fall down the hill but others will? Even if the mountain goat stays

Mountain goats have incredible cliff-climbing skills — here\'s how they do iton the top. What does it mean to you and the world?

People dont buy a land in deserts of Arizona / Nevada even is sold for $500 per acre saying that “DEAD ASSET”. What  am i going to do with that. Why dont you ask the same thing with the Cryptos. Are’nt you suppose to know what you have in hand is only worth how much you can buy in terms of basic human needs? “FOOD, WATER, LAND/HOME, CLOTHING”? Let the community get mature. Let them figure out how more goods and materials can be traded using crypto currencies without jumping into speculating and inflating their worth.

I know for many people, this is a negative talk or I am like most of the bankers/wall street guys or IMF guys. Well, I don’t trust or like central banking system or IMF as well. I hate fiat currencies backed by “NOTHING”. That does not mean that I will have to switch over to a so-called currency whose creator itself is not identifying himself. So, Don’t read me wrong. I would love to create and use my own crypto for trading the value by bypassing middle-man banks. But that’s only transactional medium, The real value is in the product/services that I make and trade. Fooling the world that the medium itself is the value is nothing but another fiat currency system and in this case worst than paper money. I am okay to use the distributed ledgers and blockchain for transactions. But I won’t value it as an asset or tradable material. So, my judgment is, you can use cryptos as an exchange medium. But an exchange medium is neither money nor an asset.

– Suresh M Kannan

Click here to view original web page at Mountain goats have incredible cliff-climbing skills — here’s how they do it


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mountain goat glamour shot
markbyzewski/Flickr

Mountain goats are amazing. They can climb super high on really steep cliffs like it's nothing.

They hang out on mountaintops for most of the year, shedding their shaggy winter coat when they lower their elevation for the spring and summer.

How do mountain goats climb so well? What are their secrets?

Here are some facts about the nimble-footed mammal.

Mountain goats are only found in North America, concentrated around the Rocky Mountains. There are about 100,000 of them today.

Mountain goats are only found in North America, concentrated around the Rocky Mountains. There are about 100,000 of them today.

Ninjatacoshell/Wikimedia Commons

Source: Defenders of Wildlife

But they're not actually goats. They're part of the antelope family.

But they're not actually goats. They're part of the antelope family.
yellowstonenps/Flickr

They use the precipitous heights of their mountain homes for protection from predators.

They use the precipitous heights of their mountain homes for protection from predators.
markbyzewski/Flickr

Their biggest predators are bears, wolves, cougars, and golden eagles, which can snatch up kids. Humans are a problem, too, since hunting is legal in many states they call home.

Their biggest predators are bears, wolves, cougars, and golden eagles, which can snatch up kids. Humans are a problem, too, since hunting is legal in many states they call home.

Brian A. Ridder/Wikimedia Commons

Sources: Switch Zoo, Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Males are called billies and females are called nannies.

Males are called billies and females are called nannies.
davidwilson1949/Flickr

Kids can start climbing with their parents when they're just days old.

Kids can start climbing with their parents when they're just days old.
matyra/Flickr

Source: Defenders of Wildlife

Mountain goats typically live at elevations above 10,000 feet. They migrate to lower elevations during the spring and summer, but return to their mountaintops to survive the long winter.

Mountain goats typically live at elevations above 10,000 feet. They migrate to lower elevations during the spring and summer, but return to their mountaintops to survive the long winter.
Darklich14/Wikimedia Commons

Source: Woodland Park Zoo

Mountain goats can pull themselves up inclines with just one hoof.

Mountain goats can pull themselves up inclines with just one hoof.
rayandbee/Flickr

Source: Woodland Park Zoo

They can scale slopes at angles above 60 degrees.

They can scale slopes at angles above 60 degrees.
jerrykeenan/Flickr

Source: Woodland Park Zoo

Look at it go!

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Mountain goats owe their climbing abilities to their crazy feet. They're hard and bony on the outside, and soft on the inside.

Mountain goats owe their climbing abilities to their crazy feet. They're hard and bony on the outside, and soft on the inside.
goldberg/Flickr

They can wiggle their front toes together and apart so they can grip surfaces better. And the convex shape of their hooves act like slip-proof soles.

They can wiggle their front toes together and apart so they can grip surfaces better. And the convex shape of their hooves act like slip-proof soles.
markbyzewski/Flickr

Source: Woodland Park Zoo

Mountain goats can also jump up to 12 feet.

Mountain goats can also jump up to 12 feet.
markbyzewski/Flickr

Source: National Geographic

You can count the number of rings on their horns to tell how old they are, just like a tree.

You can count the number of rings on their horns to tell how old they are, just like a tree.

gailfisher/Flickr

Source: Defenders of Wildlife

They graze on grasses and other plants for food.

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A goat's-eye view from a GoPro.

Source: Woodland Park Zoo

Goats love savory snacks, like this one that's licking the guardrail at Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park because sweaty human hands left salt on it.

Goats love savory snacks, like this one that's licking the guardrail at Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park because sweaty human hands left salt on it.

Avenue/Wikimedia Commons

In the wild, mountain goats can live up to 15 years. Long live the crazy, cool mountain goat!

In the wild, mountain goats can live up to 15 years. Long live the crazy, cool mountain goat!
mikelehen/Flickr

Source: Woodland Park Zoo